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  • 09/02/10--13:01: Financing U.S. Study
  • These articles for students from the Middle East/North Africa examine U.S. study costs and planning, strategies and resources for finding financial aid, and ways to save while you are actually in the United States.

    We will be updating and adding material to this web site so be sure to visit regularly.

    If you have questions not currently answered on our site, please write us or contact your nearest AMIDEAST office. AMIDEAST offices can provide the most current and complete information on scholarship opportunities for students from your country as well as presentations and workshops on strategies for funding U.S. Study.


    0 0
  • 09/02/10--13:38: Funding U.S. Study
  • Education is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

    To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

    Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

    • Planning
    • Sources of Financial Aid
    • For More Information on Financial Aid Information

    Planning

    Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

    Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

    Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

    • College and university application fees
    • Fees for standardized tests
    • Tuition
    • Required fees
    • Travel expenses
    • Housing and meals
    • Books and supplies
    • Health insurance
    • Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

    If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

    Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.

    Sources of Financial Aid

    The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

    As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

    Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

    First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

    The U.S. government provides some limited aid to international students, primarily at the graduate level. The AMIDEAST or other EducationUSA center nearest you can provide details on current programs. You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

    Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.

    For More Information on Financial Aid

    You can also find more detailed information on U.S. university costs, financial planning, and scholarship opportunities on this site. See also Web pages for particular AMIDEAST offices for information on scholarships that AMIDEAST may administer in specific locations.  Contact the EducationUSA centers at AMIDEAST offices or in whatever location is nearest you directly for the most current and complete information on these and other opportunities.


    0 0

    Education is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

    To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

    Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

    Planning

    Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

    Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

    Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

    • College and university application fees
    • Fees for standardized tests
    • Tuition
    • Required fees
    • Travel expenses
    • Housing and meals
    • Books and supplies
    • Health insurance
    • Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

    If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

    Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.

    Sources of Financial Aid

    The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

    As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

    Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

    First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

    You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

    Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.

    For More Information on Financial Aid

    You can also find more detailed information on U.S. university costs, financial planning, and scholarship opportunities on this site. See also Web pages for particular AMIDEAST offices for information on scholarships that AMIDEAST may administer in specific locations.  Contact the offices directly for the most current and complete information on these and other opportunities.


    0 0

    Start with our page on , which covers the most important information on this subject.

    Below are the additional questions that we’ve researched so far related to funding U.S. study. We regularly add new questions we’ve responded to on this subject, so check back for more.

    If you have questions not currently answered on our site, please write us.


    What are current average U.S. tuition costs?

     

    What is “out-of-state” tuition?

     

    I’ve heard that it’s less expensive to attend a community college for my first two years of undergraduate study. Can you tell me more about this?

     

    What are the trends in the United States regarding aid availability for different fields and levels of study?

     

    What are the different types of U.S. university aid for undergraduate students?

     

    What are the different types of U.S. university aid for graduate students?

     

    What are some ways that I can earn credit toward an undergraduate degree before I actually enter a U.S. college?

     

    I have U.S. citizenship as well as Arab citizenship—does this make a difference in my financial aid chances?

     

    Can I get a loan to help pay my tuition?

     

    Can I work while I am in the United States?

     

    I saw an advertisement offering “guaranteed scholarships.” Is this for real?

     

    I read in the materials of the college that I’m interested in that they do not have aid for international students. I do need aid, but I’m an extremely good student—should I apply to this institution anyway?

     


    0 0

    Below are links to some additional useful sources of financial aid information available online. See also our U.S. Life section for some strategies and resources to save you money during travel and/or once you arrive in the United States and our Fields of Study section for resources that may exist for students in particular specialities.

    Funding for U.S. Study. Excellent source for locating the hundreds of grants specifically for international students awarded by governments, foundations, and international organizations. Searchable by country/region or field of study. Institute of International Education.

    Higher Education Funding Opportunities in the Arab World. Database of higher education scholarships and opportunities from local and regional sources within the Middle East/North Africa has been produced by Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Covers the following countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates. Searchable by type of support, field of study, level of study, and student country.

    College Board Scholarship Search. For U.S. and international undergraduate students, lists about over 2,300 scholarships, internships and loans drawn from the College Board Scholarship Handbook.

    Edupass. Specifically for international students considering U.S. study, this site discusses admissions, financing, English language study, visas, cultural differences, U.S. life and more. Includes a list showing which U.S. colleges and universities award the most financial aid to their international undergraduate students.

    Fastweb. Students can enter profile (including citizenship information) then search database of scholarships (mostly for U.S. citizens). Additional matches may be sent in e-mail updates. College search program also available.

    Finaid. While most information specifically for international students appears on sister site Edupass (see above), Finaid is also a valuable resource. For instance, it includes a list of Web addresses for college and university financial aid offices and information on scholarship scams.

    Foundation Center International Visitor Information. Includes a section on aid for international students that provides links for a range of resources.

    Grants and Related Resources. From Michigan State University Libraries, includes links to a wide range of Web resources.

    Grants Information Collection. This resource from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, contains a wealth of information on both grants for individuals (including specifically international students) and fundraising resources and sources for nonprofit organizations.

    GrantsNet. Search for funding to support research and advanced study in the biomedical sciences as well as undergraduate science education.

    International Education Financial Aid. Specifically for those studying in a country other than their own, including international students in the United States. Includes database of over 1,000 scholarships, searchable by field of study.

    Mobility International, Financial Aid Resources for Non-U.S. Citizens. Focus on aid for students with disabilities.

    Check with your nearest AMIDEAST office for the latest information on scholarship opportunities for individuals in your country as well as other strategies for funding U.S. study.


    0 0
  • 09/09/10--09:53: U.S. Life: Savings Tips
  • Entering a U.S. college or university? Congratulations!
    Wondering how you’ll afford U.S. life? You’re not alone. We’ve gathered dozens of ideas and resources to help you through your international experience in the best possible financial health. Also see our Living in the United States resources page for links to sites that can help you save during your travel and U.S. study.

    Tuition

    To save on tuition after you’ve started college, explore the possible existence of merit scholarships awarded for high grades. Some state institutions offer out-of-state tuition waivers under certain circumstances. Some institutions offer scholarships or tuition reduction to students involved in cultural or leadership programs. All of these possibilities can save thousands of dollars—research them.

    Many U.S. undergraduate programs will award credit toward your degree for successful completion of examinations demonstrating your mastery of college-level knowledge. While some of these tests, such as the Advanced Placement examination, need to be taken during secondary school, others, such as the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Standardized Subject Tests (DSST) typically can be taken and accepted for credit at any point during your enrollment. All AMIDEAST EducationUSA centers can administer CLEP and DSST tests, and many colleges and universities have also have test centers that offer these tests. Speak to the admissions office at your school about policies and local test center availability.

    At some schools, tuition rates are lower during the summer sessions than during the academic year. Earn credits then, not only to take advantage of the savings but also to reduce the amount of time it will take to earn your degree. You may also want to consider taking summer or night classes at a local community college or other institution with lower tuition than your own college if your college will accept the credits.

    Be realistic about your limits in terms of the number and types of classes you take. Hurrying through a noncredit English program in order to take for-credit classes or trying to take too many classes at once can be a recipe for trouble. If you have to retake classes, not only will you be frustrated but you will have to spend more money.

    Employment

    Employment of international students is strictly regulated and limited in the United States. You will be restricted to twenty hours per week of work during the academic year, and during your first nine months of study any job you take must be on-campus.

    Even after that time, off-campus employment involves fairly complex legal requirements and limits—discuss this issue with your international student adviser. Look into whether your college has a “cooperative education program” or can provide information on off-campus internships related to your field of study. Unfortunately, you can’t expect employment to pay your way, but it can help with your day-to-day expenses.

    You need to manage your job schedules carefully so that your employment makes the best use of their time. Try to get a job that promotes your academic progress (for example, compiling databases for the business school or working in the chemistry labs). Such experiences look good on your résumé, and may also allow you to study while working (particularly some positions in the library or computer lab).

    Housing and Food

    Where you live will be your biggest expense after tuition. Living off campus is sometimes less expensive, sometimes not. If you are in your first year of study, you will almost always be better off living in campus housing, not only because dormitory life usually provides good support for the adjustment to U.S. life but also because it requires local knowledge to find and furnish a cost-effective apartment in a safe neighborhood. Rent may be lower than campus housing fees, but expenses such as utilities, heat, computer access (campus networks are generally superior), security, and transportation costs may add up to make off-campus life more expensive.

    Many universities have cooperative houses or apartment-style housing that can provide an ideal compromise for those who prefer the privacy of off-campus living or have family members coming to campus with them. New international students can often apply for such housing. Be sure to ask as early as possible since such housing options are likely to be in high demand.

    Meal plans in campus dining facilities are generally more expensive than cooking for oneself. However, consider if you will indeed be willing and able to cook for yourself regularly—campus meal plans will provide cheaper (and generally more nutritious) options than a restaurant diet can.

    Some other options for saving on housing and meal costs include the following:

    • Sharing an apartment with friends or fellow students and splitting the rent. Be realistic, however, about how many people and exactly who you can live with comfortably. Beyond the fact of housing codes (which limit the number of people who can legally share living quarters), you will need some private space to pursue your studies. Roommates, especially those with different habits and priorities than your own, can be amazingly stressful.
       
    • Becoming a resident assistant in college or university dormitories. (This opportunity, which involves helping other students adjust to campus life and resolve housing concerns, is usually open only to graduate students or undergraduates who have already spent several years on campus.)
       
    • Living off-campus with relatives or family friends. Of course this is only an option if you're lucky enough to find a suitable university near people willing to host you.
       
    • Taking part in a “homestay” if these are available at the campus or community where you are located. These will not provide permanent housing but can help you get settled and give you a taste of life with a U.S. family, free or for low cost. Building a good relationship with your “host family” also often helps to reduce long-term costs. Host families may be able to offer you a place to stay over during holidays, provide transportation to a dentist on the other side of town, or provide advice on the best places to shop.
       
    • Students on some campuses may be able to work in the dining hall in exchange for “all you can eat” free food.

    Study-Related Expenses

    Buying used books is a crucial skill for budget-conscious students. The keys to success are to get to the bookstore early in order to get the best deals, and to make private deals at the end of the semester with students who just completed a course that you're about to take.

    You can also often sell your textbooks at the end of a course, but you need to remember to keep your books in good shape in order to get good resale prices.

    Using the campus computer labs is less expensive than buying your own computer, but at the end of the term, these labs will be crowded with last-minute writers. If you're dependent on the campus lab, you must be disciplined and not a procrastinator.

    Health Care

    Before you leave home, have a dental and optical checkup, and take care of health needs. Health care will generally be more expensive in the United States than at home.

    Skimping on health insurance is the worst possible way to save money. Health insurance is very expensive in the United States, but it’s worth it. It will cost you much, much more if you become ill or are injured without sufficient insurance coverage. Don’t compromise.

    Transportation

    Try to minimize transportation costs by either staying as close to campus as is possible or by staying where most of the services that you will require are located. Do not try to own and operate a car unless that is an absolute necessity where you are located. Keep in mind that the purchase of a car is only the first expense—required insurance as well as repairs will add significantly to the cost. If you do need to buy a car, take a car owner’s maintenance and repair class at a community college to cut down on mechanic’s charges. Get advice on mechanics from someone familiar with the area so that you are not overcharged by an unethical mechanic.

    Clothing and “Incidentals”

    Winter clothing can be a major expense for students from warmer climates. Talk to experienced students about how to buy that all-important winter coat, how to dress in layers, which fabrics retain heat most effectively, and what kind of footwear protects your feet against ice and snow. Once on campus, try to make friends with people who know the community where you are located—they can tell you the best places to shop.

    Purchase necessary items before entertainment and desired items. Learn to get your “extras” from free sources. Many public libraries have movies to loan for free. Read magazines there as well instead of buying them. Seek out fun activities available for little or no money, such as free concerts on campus or in the community, free movies sponsored by campus groups, picnics in area parks and forests.

    Here are some other money-saving ideas:

    • E-mail, IM, and/or write home. If you need to phone, try taking advantage of Skype or another less expensive Internet-based phone service.
       

    • Consider what you can bring from home rather than purchasing in the United States. Research what basic supplies are likely to be significantly more expensive (or hard to find at all).
       

    • Shop in second-hand and discount stores. Explore garage, yard, and rummage sales for bargains.
       

    • Buy generic rather than brand-name items.
       

    • When going out with friends, take a limited amount of money with you. Leave your credit card at home.
       

    • Think long-term. Avoid high interest credit cards and loans.


    0 0
  • 09/02/10--13:01: Financing U.S. Study
  • These articles for students from the Middle East/North Africa examine U.S. study costs and planning, strategies and resources for finding financial aid, and ways to save while you are actually in the United States.

    We will be updating and adding material to this web site so be sure to visit regularly.

    If you have questions not currently answered on our site, please write us or contact your nearest AMIDEAST office. AMIDEAST offices can provide the most current and complete information on scholarship opportunities for students from your country as well as presentations and workshops on strategies for funding U.S. Study.


    0 0
  • 09/02/10--13:38: Funding U.S. Study
  • Education is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

    To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

    Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

    • Planning
    • Sources of Financial Aid
    • For More Information on Financial Aid Information

    Planning

    Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

    Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

    Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

    • College and university application fees
    • Fees for standardized tests
    • Tuition
    • Required fees
    • Travel expenses
    • Housing and meals
    • Books and supplies
    • Health insurance
    • Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

    If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

    Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.

    Sources of Financial Aid

    The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

    As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

    Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

    First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

    The U.S. government provides some limited aid to international students, primarily at the graduate level. The AMIDEAST or other EducationUSA center nearest you can provide details on current programs. You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

    Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.

    For More Information on Financial Aid

    You can also find more detailed information on U.S. university costs, financial planning, and scholarship opportunities on this site. See also Web pages for particular AMIDEAST offices for information on scholarships that AMIDEAST may administer in specific locations.  Contact the EducationUSA centers at AMIDEAST offices or in whatever location is nearest you directly for the most current and complete information on these and other opportunities.


    0 0

    Education is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

    To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

    Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

    Planning

    Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

    Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

    Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

    • College and university application fees
    • Fees for standardized tests
    • Tuition
    • Required fees
    • Travel expenses
    • Housing and meals
    • Books and supplies
    • Health insurance
    • Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

    If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

    Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.

    Sources of Financial Aid

    The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

    As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

    Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

    First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

    You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

    Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.

    For More Information on Financial Aid

    You can also find more detailed information on U.S. university costs, financial planning, and scholarship opportunities on this site. See also Web pages for particular AMIDEAST offices for information on scholarships that AMIDEAST may administer in specific locations.  Contact the offices directly for the most current and complete information on these and other opportunities.


    0 0

    Start with our page on , which covers the most important information on this subject.

    Below are the additional questions that we’ve researched so far related to funding U.S. study. We regularly add new questions we’ve responded to on this subject, so check back for more.

    If you have questions not currently answered on our site, please write us.


    What are current average U.S. tuition costs?

     

    What is “out-of-state” tuition?

     

    I’ve heard that it’s less expensive to attend a community college for my first two years of undergraduate study. Can you tell me more about this?

     

    What are the trends in the United States regarding aid availability for different fields and levels of study?

     

    What are the different types of U.S. university aid for undergraduate students?

     

    What are the different types of U.S. university aid for graduate students?

     

    What are some ways that I can earn credit toward an undergraduate degree before I actually enter a U.S. college?

     

    I have U.S. citizenship as well as Arab citizenship—does this make a difference in my financial aid chances?

     

    Can I get a loan to help pay my tuition?

     

    Can I work while I am in the United States?

     

    I saw an advertisement offering “guaranteed scholarships.” Is this for real?

     

    I read in the materials of the college that I’m interested in that they do not have aid for international students. I do need aid, but I’m an extremely good student—should I apply to this institution anyway?

     


    0 0

    Below are links to some additional useful sources of financial aid information available online. See also our U.S. Life section for some strategies and resources to save you money during travel and/or once you arrive in the United States and our Fields of Study section for resources that may exist for students in particular specialities.

    Funding for U.S. Study. Excellent source for locating the hundreds of grants specifically for international students awarded by governments, foundations, and international organizations. Searchable by country/region or field of study. Institute of International Education.

    Higher Education Funding Opportunities in the Arab World. Database of higher education scholarships and opportunities from local and regional sources within the Middle East/North Africa has been produced by Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Covers the following countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates. Searchable by type of support, field of study, level of study, and student country.

    College Board Scholarship Search. For U.S. and international undergraduate students, lists about over 2,300 scholarships, internships and loans drawn from the College Board Scholarship Handbook.

    Edupass. Specifically for international students considering U.S. study, this site discusses admissions, financing, English language study, visas, cultural differences, U.S. life and more. Includes a list showing which U.S. colleges and universities award the most financial aid to their international undergraduate students.

    Fastweb. Students can enter profile (including citizenship information) then search database of scholarships (mostly for U.S. citizens). Additional matches may be sent in e-mail updates. College search program also available.

    Finaid. While most information specifically for international students appears on sister site Edupass (see above), Finaid is also a valuable resource. For instance, it includes a list of Web addresses for college and university financial aid offices and information on scholarship scams.

    Foundation Center International Visitor Information. Includes a section on aid for international students that provides links for a range of resources.

    Grants and Related Resources. From Michigan State University Libraries, includes links to a wide range of Web resources.

    Grants Information Collection. This resource from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, contains a wealth of information on both grants for individuals (including specifically international students) and fundraising resources and sources for nonprofit organizations.

    GrantsNet. Search for funding to support research and advanced study in the biomedical sciences as well as undergraduate science education.

    International Education Financial Aid. Specifically for those studying in a country other than their own, including international students in the United States. Includes database of over 1,000 scholarships, searchable by field of study.

    Mobility International, Financial Aid Resources for Non-U.S. Citizens. Focus on aid for students with disabilities.

    Check with your nearest AMIDEAST office for the latest information on scholarship opportunities for individuals in your country as well as other strategies for funding U.S. study.


    0 0
  • 09/09/10--09:53: U.S. Life: Savings Tips
  • Entering a U.S. college or university? Congratulations!
    Wondering how you’ll afford U.S. life? You’re not alone. We’ve gathered dozens of ideas and resources to help you through your international experience in the best possible financial health. Also see our Living in the United States resources page for links to sites that can help you save during your travel and U.S. study.

    Tuition

    To save on tuition after you’ve started college, explore the possible existence of merit scholarships awarded for high grades. Some state institutions offer out-of-state tuition waivers under certain circumstances. Some institutions offer scholarships or tuition reduction to students involved in cultural or leadership programs. All of these possibilities can save thousands of dollars—research them.

    Many U.S. undergraduate programs will award credit toward your degree for successful completion of examinations demonstrating your mastery of college-level knowledge. While some of these tests, such as the Advanced Placement examination, need to be taken during secondary school, others, such as the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Standardized Subject Tests (DSST) typically can be taken and accepted for credit at any point during your enrollment. All AMIDEAST EducationUSA centers can administer CLEP and DSST tests, and many colleges and universities have also have test centers that offer these tests. Speak to the admissions office at your school about policies and local test center availability.

    At some schools, tuition rates are lower during the summer sessions than during the academic year. Earn credits then, not only to take advantage of the savings but also to reduce the amount of time it will take to earn your degree. You may also want to consider taking summer or night classes at a local community college or other institution with lower tuition than your own college if your college will accept the credits.

    Be realistic about your limits in terms of the number and types of classes you take. Hurrying through a noncredit English program in order to take for-credit classes or trying to take too many classes at once can be a recipe for trouble. If you have to retake classes, not only will you be frustrated but you will have to spend more money.

    Employment

    Employment of international students is strictly regulated and limited in the United States. You will be restricted to twenty hours per week of work during the academic year, and during your first nine months of study any job you take must be on-campus.

    Even after that time, off-campus employment involves fairly complex legal requirements and limits—discuss this issue with your international student adviser. Look into whether your college has a “cooperative education program” or can provide information on off-campus internships related to your field of study. Unfortunately, you can’t expect employment to pay your way, but it can help with your day-to-day expenses.

    You need to manage your job schedules carefully so that your employment makes the best use of their time. Try to get a job that promotes your academic progress (for example, compiling databases for the business school or working in the chemistry labs). Such experiences look good on your résumé, and may also allow you to study while working (particularly some positions in the library or computer lab).

    Housing and Food

    Where you live will be your biggest expense after tuition. Living off campus is sometimes less expensive, sometimes not. If you are in your first year of study, you will almost always be better off living in campus housing, not only because dormitory life usually provides good support for the adjustment to U.S. life but also because it requires local knowledge to find and furnish a cost-effective apartment in a safe neighborhood. Rent may be lower than campus housing fees, but expenses such as utilities, heat, computer access (campus networks are generally superior), security, and transportation costs may add up to make off-campus life more expensive.

    Many universities have cooperative houses or apartment-style housing that can provide an ideal compromise for those who prefer the privacy of off-campus living or have family members coming to campus with them. New international students can often apply for such housing. Be sure to ask as early as possible since such housing options are likely to be in high demand.

    Meal plans in campus dining facilities are generally more expensive than cooking for oneself. However, consider if you will indeed be willing and able to cook for yourself regularly—campus meal plans will provide cheaper (and generally more nutritious) options than a restaurant diet can.

    Some other options for saving on housing and meal costs include the following:

    • Sharing an apartment with friends or fellow students and splitting the rent. Be realistic, however, about how many people and exactly who you can live with comfortably. Beyond the fact of housing codes (which limit the number of people who can legally share living quarters), you will need some private space to pursue your studies. Roommates, especially those with different habits and priorities than your own, can be amazingly stressful.
       
    • Becoming a resident assistant in college or university dormitories. (This opportunity, which involves helping other students adjust to campus life and resolve housing concerns, is usually open only to graduate students or undergraduates who have already spent several years on campus.)
       
    • Living off-campus with relatives or family friends. Of course this is only an option if you're lucky enough to find a suitable university near people willing to host you.
       
    • Taking part in a “homestay” if these are available at the campus or community where you are located. These will not provide permanent housing but can help you get settled and give you a taste of life with a U.S. family, free or for low cost. Building a good relationship with your “host family” also often helps to reduce long-term costs. Host families may be able to offer you a place to stay over during holidays, provide transportation to a dentist on the other side of town, or provide advice on the best places to shop.
       
    • Students on some campuses may be able to work in the dining hall in exchange for “all you can eat” free food.

    Study-Related Expenses

    Buying used books is a crucial skill for budget-conscious students. The keys to success are to get to the bookstore early in order to get the best deals, and to make private deals at the end of the semester with students who just completed a course that you're about to take.

    You can also often sell your textbooks at the end of a course, but you need to remember to keep your books in good shape in order to get good resale prices.

    Using the campus computer labs is less expensive than buying your own computer, but at the end of the term, these labs will be crowded with last-minute writers. If you're dependent on the campus lab, you must be disciplined and not a procrastinator.

    Health Care

    Before you leave home, have a dental and optical checkup, and take care of health needs. Health care will generally be more expensive in the United States than at home.

    Skimping on health insurance is the worst possible way to save money. Health insurance is very expensive in the United States, but it’s worth it. It will cost you much, much more if you become ill or are injured without sufficient insurance coverage. Don’t compromise.

    Transportation

    Try to minimize transportation costs by either staying as close to campus as is possible or by staying where most of the services that you will require are located. Do not try to own and operate a car unless that is an absolute necessity where you are located. Keep in mind that the purchase of a car is only the first expense—required insurance as well as repairs will add significantly to the cost. If you do need to buy a car, take a car owner’s maintenance and repair class at a community college to cut down on mechanic’s charges. Get advice on mechanics from someone familiar with the area so that you are not overcharged by an unethical mechanic.

    Clothing and “Incidentals”

    Winter clothing can be a major expense for students from warmer climates. Talk to experienced students about how to buy that all-important winter coat, how to dress in layers, which fabrics retain heat most effectively, and what kind of footwear protects your feet against ice and snow. Once on campus, try to make friends with people who know the community where you are located—they can tell you the best places to shop.

    Purchase necessary items before entertainment and desired items. Learn to get your “extras” from free sources. Many public libraries have movies to loan for free. Read magazines there as well instead of buying them. Seek out fun activities available for little or no money, such as free concerts on campus or in the community, free movies sponsored by campus groups, picnics in area parks and forests.

    Here are some other money-saving ideas:

    • E-mail, IM, and/or write home. If you need to phone, try taking advantage of Skype or another less expensive Internet-based phone service.
       

    • Consider what you can bring from home rather than purchasing in the United States. Research what basic supplies are likely to be significantly more expensive (or hard to find at all).
       

    • Shop in second-hand and discount stores. Explore garage, yard, and rummage sales for bargains.
       

    • Buy generic rather than brand-name items.
       

    • When going out with friends, take a limited amount of money with you. Leave your credit card at home.
       

    • Think long-term. Avoid high interest credit cards and loans.


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  • 09/02/10--13:01: Financing U.S. Study
  • These articles for students from the Middle East/North Africa examine U.S. study costs and planning, strategies and resources for finding financial aid, and ways to save while you are actually in the United States.

    We will be updating and adding material to this web site so be sure to visit regularly.

    If you have questions not currently answered on our site, please write us or contact your nearest AMIDEAST office. AMIDEAST offices can provide the most current and complete information on scholarship opportunities for students from your country as well as presentations and workshops on strategies for funding U.S. Study.


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  • 09/02/10--13:38: Funding U.S. Study
  • Education is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

    To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

    Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

    • Planning
    • Sources of Financial Aid
    • For More Information on Financial Aid Information

    Planning

    Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

    Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

    Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

    • College and university application fees
    • Fees for standardized tests
    • Tuition
    • Required fees
    • Travel expenses
    • Housing and meals
    • Books and supplies
    • Health insurance
    • Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

    If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

    Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.

    Sources of Financial Aid

    The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

    As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

    Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

    First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

    The U.S. government provides some limited aid to international students, primarily at the graduate level. The AMIDEAST or other EducationUSA center nearest you can provide details on current programs. You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

    Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.

    For More Information on Financial Aid

    You can also find more detailed information on U.S. university costs, financial planning, and scholarship opportunities on this site. See also Web pages for particular AMIDEAST offices for information on scholarships that AMIDEAST may administer in specific locations.  Contact the EducationUSA centers at AMIDEAST offices or in whatever location is nearest you directly for the most current and complete information on these and other opportunities.


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    Education is an investment in your future that can bring great returns. U.S. study offers more choices than any other educational system, allowing you to match your future plans closely with your curriculum.

    To be able to make the investment in U.S. study, smart planning is the key—you need to do research to identify U.S. funding possibilities that match your own needs and strengths.

    Below are some suggestions and strategies to help you get off to the best possible start in funding your U.S. studies.

    Planning

    Begin researching the costs of your planned program well in advance. All U.S. universities and colleges can provide an estimate of tuition and living costs at their particular institution. Both tuition and living costs can vary widely.

    Aid availability also varies and can make a big difference—don’t assume an institution is too expensive without checking how much aid is available to international students there.

    Be sure to consider the following types of expenses:

    • College and university application fees
    • Fees for standardized tests
    • Tuition
    • Required fees
    • Travel expenses
    • Housing and meals
    • Books and supplies
    • Health insurance
    • Clothing, recreation, incidental expenses

    If you plan to study in the United States for several years, consider how you will fund the whole period of study.

    Start researching financial aid possibilities as early as possible—one to two years before you plan to go to the United States. Be aware that financial aid deadlines may be months earlier than regular application deadlines. Give yourself time to get together a quality aid application and assemble standardized test scores, transcripts, recommendations, essays, and so forth.

    Sources of Financial Aid

    The university or college you will attend is the most likely source of outside funding—over 10 percent of undergraduate and over 45 percent of graduate international students in the United States receive primary funding from their college or university, according to statistics maintained by the Institute for International Education.

    As is clear from this statistic, funding is much more available at the graduate level. However, some undergraduate institutions also offer scholarships, based on academic merit or, less commonly, a background of community service, athletic ability, talent in the visual or performing arts, or other criteria.

    Graduate teaching or research assistantships are one type of aid commonly awarded by universities to graduate-level students. Students with assistantships may be expected to teach sections of undergraduate classes or help professors with their research. In return, they may receive a salary to cover part of their educational costs or they may be excused from paying tuition.

    First-year graduate students are not usually immediately given assistantships—they are first expected to demonstrate academic and teaching ability as well as fluency in English. Assistantships are more available in some fields of study than others. For instance many are awarded in the sciences, a smaller number in the humanities and social sciences, and very few or in professional programs such as business or law.

    You should also check on the availability of local and international government aid programs, which provide primary support to about 4 percent of international students in the United States.

    Finally, sources such as private associations and international foundations may award grants for education. These are often hotly competed and tend to provide only small amounts of funding rather than full support. Combined with other funding, however, such awards may be helpful in achieving your goal of U.S. study.

    For More Information on Financial Aid

    You can also find more detailed information on U.S. university costs, financial planning, and scholarship opportunities on this site. See also Web pages for particular AMIDEAST offices for information on scholarships that AMIDEAST may administer in specific locations.  Contact the offices directly for the most current and complete information on these and other opportunities.


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    Start with our page on , which covers the most important information on this subject.

    Below are the additional questions that we’ve researched so far related to funding U.S. study. We regularly add new questions we’ve responded to on this subject, so check back for more.

    If you have questions not currently answered on our site, please write us.


    What are current average U.S. tuition costs?

     

    What is “out-of-state” tuition?

     

    I’ve heard that it’s less expensive to attend a community college for my first two years of undergraduate study. Can you tell me more about this?

     

    What are the trends in the United States regarding aid availability for different fields and levels of study?

     

    What are the different types of U.S. university aid for undergraduate students?

     

    What are the different types of U.S. university aid for graduate students?

     

    What are some ways that I can earn credit toward an undergraduate degree before I actually enter a U.S. college?

     

    I have U.S. citizenship as well as Arab citizenship—does this make a difference in my financial aid chances?

     

    Can I get a loan to help pay my tuition?

     

    Can I work while I am in the United States?

     

    I saw an advertisement offering “guaranteed scholarships.” Is this for real?

     

    I read in the materials of the college that I’m interested in that they do not have aid for international students. I do need aid, but I’m an extremely good student—should I apply to this institution anyway?

     


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    Below are links to some additional useful sources of financial aid information available online. See also our U.S. Life section for some strategies and resources to save you money during travel and/or once you arrive in the United States and our Fields of Study section for resources that may exist for students in particular specialities.

    Funding for U.S. Study. Excellent source for locating the hundreds of grants specifically for international students awarded by governments, foundations, and international organizations. Searchable by country/region or field of study. Institute of International Education.

    Higher Education Funding Opportunities in the Arab World. Database of higher education scholarships and opportunities from local and regional sources within the Middle East/North Africa has been produced by Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Covers the following countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates. Searchable by type of support, field of study, level of study, and student country.

    College Board Scholarship Search. For U.S. and international undergraduate students, lists about over 2,300 scholarships, internships and loans drawn from the College Board Scholarship Handbook.

    Edupass. Specifically for international students considering U.S. study, this site discusses admissions, financing, English language study, visas, cultural differences, U.S. life and more. Includes a list showing which U.S. colleges and universities award the most financial aid to their international undergraduate students.

    Fastweb. Students can enter profile (including citizenship information) then search database of scholarships (mostly for U.S. citizens). Additional matches may be sent in e-mail updates. College search program also available.

    Finaid. While most information specifically for international students appears on sister site Edupass (see above), Finaid is also a valuable resource. For instance, it includes a list of Web addresses for college and university financial aid offices and information on scholarship scams.

    Foundation Center International Visitor Information. Includes a section on aid for international students that provides links for a range of resources.

    Grants and Related Resources. From Michigan State University Libraries, includes links to a wide range of Web resources.

    Grants Information Collection. This resource from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, contains a wealth of information on both grants for individuals (including specifically international students) and fundraising resources and sources for nonprofit organizations.

    GrantsNet. Search for funding to support research and advanced study in the biomedical sciences as well as undergraduate science education.

    International Education Financial Aid. Specifically for those studying in a country other than their own, including international students in the United States. Includes database of over 1,000 scholarships, searchable by field of study.

    Mobility International, Financial Aid Resources for Non-U.S. Citizens. Focus on aid for students with disabilities.

    Check with your nearest AMIDEAST office for the latest information on scholarship opportunities for individuals in your country as well as other strategies for funding U.S. study.


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  • 09/09/10--09:53: U.S. Life: Savings Tips
  • Entering a U.S. college or university? Congratulations!
    Wondering how you’ll afford U.S. life? You’re not alone. We’ve gathered dozens of ideas and resources to help you through your international experience in the best possible financial health. Also see our Living in the United States resources page for links to sites that can help you save during your travel and U.S. study.

    Tuition

    To save on tuition after you’ve started college, explore the possible existence of merit scholarships awarded for high grades. Some state institutions offer out-of-state tuition waivers under certain circumstances. Some institutions offer scholarships or tuition reduction to students involved in cultural or leadership programs. All of these possibilities can save thousands of dollars—research them.

    Many U.S. undergraduate programs will award credit toward your degree for successful completion of examinations demonstrating your mastery of college-level knowledge. While some of these tests, such as the Advanced Placement examination, need to be taken during secondary school, others, such as the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Standardized Subject Tests (DSST) typically can be taken and accepted for credit at any point during your enrollment. All AMIDEAST EducationUSA centers can administer CLEP and DSST tests, and many colleges and universities have also have test centers that offer these tests. Speak to the admissions office at your school about policies and local test center availability.

    At some schools, tuition rates are lower during the summer sessions than during the academic year. Earn credits then, not only to take advantage of the savings but also to reduce the amount of time it will take to earn your degree. You may also want to consider taking summer or night classes at a local community college or other institution with lower tuition than your own college if your college will accept the credits.

    Be realistic about your limits in terms of the number and types of classes you take. Hurrying through a noncredit English program in order to take for-credit classes or trying to take too many classes at once can be a recipe for trouble. If you have to retake classes, not only will you be frustrated but you will have to spend more money.

    Employment

    Employment of international students is strictly regulated and limited in the United States. You will be restricted to twenty hours per week of work during the academic year, and during your first nine months of study any job you take must be on-campus.

    Even after that time, off-campus employment involves fairly complex legal requirements and limits—discuss this issue with your international student adviser. Look into whether your college has a “cooperative education program” or can provide information on off-campus internships related to your field of study. Unfortunately, you can’t expect employment to pay your way, but it can help with your day-to-day expenses.

    You need to manage your job schedules carefully so that your employment makes the best use of their time. Try to get a job that promotes your academic progress (for example, compiling databases for the business school or working in the chemistry labs). Such experiences look good on your résumé, and may also allow you to study while working (particularly some positions in the library or computer lab).

    Housing and Food

    Where you live will be your biggest expense after tuition. Living off campus is sometimes less expensive, sometimes not. If you are in your first year of study, you will almost always be better off living in campus housing, not only because dormitory life usually provides good support for the adjustment to U.S. life but also because it requires local knowledge to find and furnish a cost-effective apartment in a safe neighborhood. Rent may be lower than campus housing fees, but expenses such as utilities, heat, computer access (campus networks are generally superior), security, and transportation costs may add up to make off-campus life more expensive.

    Many universities have cooperative houses or apartment-style housing that can provide an ideal compromise for those who prefer the privacy of off-campus living or have family members coming to campus with them. New international students can often apply for such housing. Be sure to ask as early as possible since such housing options are likely to be in high demand.

    Meal plans in campus dining facilities are generally more expensive than cooking for oneself. However, consider if you will indeed be willing and able to cook for yourself regularly—campus meal plans will provide cheaper (and generally more nutritious) options than a restaurant diet can.

    Some other options for saving on housing and meal costs include the following:

    • Sharing an apartment with friends or fellow students and splitting the rent. Be realistic, however, about how many people and exactly who you can live with comfortably. Beyond the fact of housing codes (which limit the number of people who can legally share living quarters), you will need some private space to pursue your studies. Roommates, especially those with different habits and priorities than your own, can be amazingly stressful.
       
    • Becoming a resident assistant in college or university dormitories. (This opportunity, which involves helping other students adjust to campus life and resolve housing concerns, is usually open only to graduate students or undergraduates who have already spent several years on campus.)
       
    • Living off-campus with relatives or family friends. Of course this is only an option if you're lucky enough to find a suitable university near people willing to host you.
       
    • Taking part in a “homestay” if these are available at the campus or community where you are located. These will not provide permanent housing but can help you get settled and give you a taste of life with a U.S. family, free or for low cost. Building a good relationship with your “host family” also often helps to reduce long-term costs. Host families may be able to offer you a place to stay over during holidays, provide transportation to a dentist on the other side of town, or provide advice on the best places to shop.
       
    • Students on some campuses may be able to work in the dining hall in exchange for “all you can eat” free food.

    Study-Related Expenses

    Buying used books is a crucial skill for budget-conscious students. The keys to success are to get to the bookstore early in order to get the best deals, and to make private deals at the end of the semester with students who just completed a course that you're about to take.

    You can also often sell your textbooks at the end of a course, but you need to remember to keep your books in good shape in order to get good resale prices.

    Using the campus computer labs is less expensive than buying your own computer, but at the end of the term, these labs will be crowded with last-minute writers. If you're dependent on the campus lab, you must be disciplined and not a procrastinator.

    Health Care

    Before you leave home, have a dental and optical checkup, and take care of health needs. Health care will generally be more expensive in the United States than at home.

    Skimping on health insurance is the worst possible way to save money. Health insurance is very expensive in the United States, but it’s worth it. It will cost you much, much more if you become ill or are injured without sufficient insurance coverage. Don’t compromise.

    Transportation

    Try to minimize transportation costs by either staying as close to campus as is possible or by staying where most of the services that you will require are located. Do not try to own and operate a car unless that is an absolute necessity where you are located. Keep in mind that the purchase of a car is only the first expense—required insurance as well as repairs will add significantly to the cost. If you do need to buy a car, take a car owner’s maintenance and repair class at a community college to cut down on mechanic’s charges. Get advice on mechanics from someone familiar with the area so that you are not overcharged by an unethical mechanic.

    Clothing and “Incidentals”

    Winter clothing can be a major expense for students from warmer climates. Talk to experienced students about how to buy that all-important winter coat, how to dress in layers, which fabrics retain heat most effectively, and what kind of footwear protects your feet against ice and snow. Once on campus, try to make friends with people who know the community where you are located—they can tell you the best places to shop.

    Purchase necessary items before entertainment and desired items. Learn to get your “extras” from free sources. Many public libraries have movies to loan for free. Read magazines there as well instead of buying them. Seek out fun activities available for little or no money, such as free concerts on campus or in the community, free movies sponsored by campus groups, picnics in area parks and forests.

    Here are some other money-saving ideas:

    • E-mail, IM, and/or write home. If you need to phone, try taking advantage of Skype or another less expensive Internet-based phone service.
       

    • Consider what you can bring from home rather than purchasing in the United States. Research what basic supplies are likely to be significantly more expensive (or hard to find at all).
       

    • Shop in second-hand and discount stores. Explore garage, yard, and rummage sales for bargains.
       

    • Buy generic rather than brand-name items.
       

    • When going out with friends, take a limited amount of money with you. Leave your credit card at home.
       

    • Think long-term. Avoid high interest credit cards and loans.